Empathy through the post

  

Today’s picture is one of a series of empathy cards produced by Emily McDowell, they are designed to send to people with serious or life threatening illnesses. Emily herself is a cancer survivor and these cards arise out of her experiences of people’s awkwardness around her and how there are no cards that say to someone what you really feel about the devastating nature of their illness. It is well worth reading what  Emily herself says about her cards and the motivation behind them.

… words for today

It takes two things for prayer to come to pass – a person and a word. Prayer involves right relationship between those two things. But we have lost that relationship. Involved as we are in many relationships, our relationship to words has become totally obscured. We do not think about words, although few things are as important for the life of the spirit as the right relationship to words. Words have become cliches, objects of absolute abuse.  They have ceased to be commitments.

Abraham Joshua Heschel (from inward/outward)

This quote really made me think. Is Heschel right? Almost certainly if you read the newspapers (in print or worse online where people can leave vitriolic comments on the stories of the day) or look at the ‘wealth’ of celebrity or fashion based magazines on the shelves of any newsagents.

We no longer craft letters, we rush off slipshod emails or make throw away comments on social networking sites, not worrying about grammar or spelling.

And in our personal relationships – do we actually talk to one another or are our conversations really ‘a dialogue of the deaf’?

We live in a world where words are cheap and plentiful.

Do we treat the words we speak to God – and the words we speak about God – in the same way?

Answers on a postcard!!

(The Wordle contains the most commonly used words in English proverbs :))

Word of the week…

Scunnered. (Noun: Scunneration)

This is one of my favourite words ever. It’s one of those brilliant Scottish words whose meaning is almost onomatopoeic – just saying it, with the right inflection (and the precise balance of vehemence and resignation) communicates its meaning:

demotivated
frustrated
disgusted
nauseated
sick of it
had enough
I’m outa here

Scunnered is a sort of blending of all these emotions into one ‘catch all’ word… we Scots are good at that!!

Being scunnered… it just isnae funny!!!